what i like
Until the lion has his historian, the hunter will always be the hero.

African Proverb 

This proverb exists in different forms in many parts of Africa

"Until lions have their own historians, tales of the hunt shall always glorify the hunter" (Igbo, Nigeria).

"Until lions start writing down their own stories, the hunters will always be the heroes" (Kenya and Zimbabwe).

(via yellowgrowngreen)

jedavu:

Jewish And Arab People Posing Together Online, ‘Refusing To Be Enemies’

In the midst of news about the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, some people are posting photos online for an international social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter, with the hashtag, #JewsAndArabsRefuseToBeEnemies. 

curvyswervydames:

cntblameme4tryn:

It’s George W…ashingtons fault http://ift.tt/WNusQG

That “is” the beautiful idea and the whole point. Three co-equal branches of a constitutional government, based on the rule of law and not men. We were escaping the oppressive boot of a tyranny, not creating a new one.

curvyswervydames:

cntblameme4tryn:

It’s George W…ashingtons fault http://ift.tt/WNusQG

That “is” the beautiful idea and the whole point. Three co-equal branches of a constitutional government, based on the rule of law and not men. We were escaping the oppressive boot of a tyranny, not creating a new one.

fablesandgables:

Marble statue of a wounded Amazon

Roman, 1st–2nd century A.D.

Marble, H. 203.84 cm (80 1/4 in.) 

Copy of a Greek bronze statue of ca. 450–425 B.C.

In Greek art, the Amazons, a mythical race of warrior women from Asia Minor, were often depicted battling such heroes as Herakles, Achilles, and Theseus. This statue represents a refugee from battle who has lost her weapons and bleeds from a wound under her right breast. Her chiton is unfastened at one shoulder and belted at the waist with a makeshift bit of bridle from her horse. Despite her plight, her face shows no sign of pain or fatigue. She leans lightly on a pillar at her left and rests her right arm gracefully on her head in a gesture often used to denote sleep or death. Such emotional restraint was characteristic of classical art of the second half of the fifth century B.C. 

The original statue probably stood in the precinct of the great temple of Artemis at Ephesos, on the coast of Asia Minor, where the Amazons has legendary and cultic connections with the goddess. The Roman writer Pliny the Elder described a competition held in the mid-fifth century B.C. between five famous sculptors, including Phidias, Polykleitos, and Kresilas, who were to make a statue of a wounded Amazon for the temple. This statue type is generally associated with that contest. [x]

adokal:

German cartoon on the British-French “Entente Cordiale" of 1904:
John Bull (Great Britain) walks off with the trollop Marianne (France), while the Kaiser (Germany) pretends not to care.
source

adokal:

German cartoon on the British-French “Entente Cordiale" of 1904:

John Bull (Great Britain) walks off with the trollop Marianne (France), while the Kaiser (Germany) pretends not to care.

source

filavaria:

Marianne de France

This national emblem of France is present everywhere but holds a place of honor in town halls and law courts. 
She symbolizes the “Triumph of the Republic”, a bronze sculpture overlooking the Place de la Nation in Paris. 
Her profile stands out on the official seal of the country, is engraved on French euro coins, and appears on French postage stamps; it also was featured on the former French franc coins and banknotes. 
Marianne is in fact considered one of the most prominent symbols of the French Republic.

The name Marie-Anne was a very popular name amongst the women of 13th C France - but only amongst the commoners, not the aristocracy, so when the people looked for a name that stood for a change of government, an inspiration in the revolution, the ‘mother of the nation’ who would nourish and protect the people of the republic - Marianne was the popular choice.

Source: http://chateaulalinde.blogspot.nl/2006/03/marianne-cest-la-libert-lgalit-et-la.html

roninonabike:

Brigitte Bardot as Marianne

roninonabike:

Brigitte Bardot as Marianne

Marianne is present everywhere in France and holds a place of honor in town halls and law courts. She symbolizes the “Triumph of the Republic”, a bronze sculpture overlooking Place de la Nation in Paris. Her profile stands out on the official seal of the country. It is engraved on coins and drawn on stamps and banknotes. Marianne is considered as the most prominent depiction of the French Republic.
But who is this women, presented, by the artist Daumier, as a mother nursing two children, or, by the sculptor Rude, as an angry warrior voicing the Marseillaise on the Arc de Triomphe, or, by the painter Delacroix, as representing Liberty leading the people on the barricades, and where does she come from? One thing is certain. Her image never leaves the French indifferent. In the last two wars, certain people worshiped her just like a saint. Others, who were anti-Republican, often dragged the image in the mud.

Since the 70s several other French women have represented Marianne but Brigitte works for me.

Back in late 1960s or early 70s Brigitte Bardot was chosen to represent Marianne, the symbol of the French Revolution. Marianne is the French name for the bare breasted Ms. Liberty represented in Delacroix’s famous painting.

I like Brigitte and Liberty so seems like France made a good match back then.

The article concludes that she, Brigitte not Marianne,  was responsible for millions of men loosing their heads and she didn’t even use the guillotine.

moralanarchism:

moralanarchism:

Fight of the Century: Keynes vs. Hayek Round Two

Whenever I see this come up on tumblr or on my youtube feed I always have to watch it.

Listening to Tom Woods interview the creator John Papola.

always worth rebloging